New Zealand (Auckland)

John Pule - Niue, New Zealand 'Kehe tauhauga foou (To All New Arrivals)'  2007 enamel, oil pencil, pastel, oil stick, & ink on canvas

John Pule - Niue, New Zealand
'Kehe tauhauga foou (To All New Arrivals)'  2007
enamel, oil pencil, pastel, oil stick, & ink on canvas

Martin Langdon (Tainui, Ngai Tahu) and Sydney-based Jonathan Jones (Wiradjuri, Kamilaroi) 'Shared Endeavour" 2015

Martin Langdon (Tainui, Ngai Tahu) and Sydney-based Jonathan Jones (Wiradjuri, Kamilaroi)
'Shared Endeavour" 2015

In New Zealand my focus was how contemporary artists of New Zealand consider both their Māori and Pākehā [1] identities in their practice. At the time I was most drawn to intangible practices like performance and dialogic work. While in Brazil I became interested in "ritual" in art, where material and practices considered sacred or spiritual were brought into a white cube context. I wished to explore the politics surrounding the ownership, spectatorship, and preservation of such practices.

Lisa Reihana 'In Pursuit of Venus' 2015

Lisa Reihana
'In Pursuit of Venus' 2015

Shane Cotton 'Free Fall' 2006 acrylic on canvas

Shane Cotton
'Free Fall' 2006
acrylic on canvas

Unfortunately due to holiday season, artists Lisa Reihana and Mata Aho were unable to meet with me. With the help of curator and scholar Anna-Marie White, I did have extremely interesting meetings with scholars and curators, Nigel Borrell, Damian Skinner, and Balamohan Shingade. Above I have included images of 6 artists whose practices stuck out to me most: 

[Please click images to be directed to artists' respective art work webpages]

Gottfried Lindauer - Czech / Pākehā 'Wahanui Reihana Te Huatare' 19th c.  oil on canvas

Gottfried Lindauer - Czech / Pākehā
'Wahanui Reihana Te Huatare' 19th c. 
oil on canvas

Mata Aho Collective 'Stop Collaborate and Listen' 2014

Mata Aho Collective
'Stop Collaborate and Listen' 2014

[1] Pākehā is a Māori language term for non-Maori or for New Zealanders who are "of European descent". Recently, the word has been used to refer inclusively either to fair-skinned persons or any non-Māori New Zealander.